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Table 2 Effective population size (N e ) estimated from linkage disequilibrium1 by fitting nonlinear regression model2 in a rainbow trout broodstock population3.

From: Estimates of linkage disequilibrium and effective population size in rainbow trout

       Confidence interval  
Chromosome Number of marker pairs Average intermarker distance (cM) Genome coverage (cM) Standard error -95% +95%
13 421 1.16 5.80 178.56 75.38 65.77 448.56 0.56
14 8817 5.67 107.80 75.51 5.62 65.24 87.14 0.24
17 1499 7.80 54.60 122.08 19.16 89.45 162.23 0.38
sex 5813 4.18 58.50 203.35 16.94 170.92 240.54 0.64
Total 16550.00 18.81 226.70 579.50 117.10 391.38 938.47 1.82
Mean 4137.50 4.70 56.68 144.88 29.27 97.85 234.62 0.45
SD     57.40 31.30 50.01 155.77 0.18
  1. 1Pairwise Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was estimated using the ALLELE procedure of the software package SAS®, version 9.3.1 (SAS Institute 2007).
  2. 2The nonlinear regression model was fitted using JMP® Genomics 3.1 (SAS Institute Inc., Carey, NC, 2007),
  3. Where is LD measure adjusted for chromosome sample size n, for marker pair i at recombination rate c i (in Morgans). The constant k had values of k = 2 for sex chromosome and k = 4 for autosomes. The c i 's were estimates of recombination rate from two-point linkage analysis [9]. First, the e i residuals were estimated by non-linear fitting of the above model with JMP® Genomics 3.1 (SAS Institute Inc., Carey, NC, 2007). Then, the parameters α and β were estimated iteratively by least squares; in this model .
  4. 3Unrelated individuals (n = 96) representing the 2005/2006 brood classes were genotyped with 49 microsatellite markers.
  5. 4Number of potential breeders (N = 320).